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EcoQuant

I am also a member of the Azimuth Project : https://www.azimuthproject.org/azimuth/show/Jan+Galkowski I belong to a large number of organizations, a number which has increased since retirement and since my interest has changed from data science and statistics for Internet management (which is what I did at my last job), to primarily quantitative ecology and learning to classify mosses. These include, of course, the American Statistical Association (although my sections will become more environmentally focused when I renew), the International Society for Bayesian Analysis, the American Bryological and Lichenological Society, the International Association of Bryologists, the New England Botanical Society, the Ecological Society of America, the American Solar Energy Society, the AAAS, the 1930 Society of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution as well as its Fye Society, and the Jepson Herbarium of UC Berkeley.

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EcoQuant
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  • I am also a member of the Azimuth Project : https://www.azimuthproject.org/azimuth/show/Jan+Galkowski

    I belong to a large number of organizations, a number which has increased since retirement and since my interest has changed from data science and statistics for Internet management (which is what I did at my last job), to primarily quantitative ecology and learning to classify mosses. These include, of course, the American Statistical Association (although my sections will become more environmentally focused when I renew), the International Society for Bayesian Analysis, the American Bryological and Lichenological Society, the International Association of Bryologists, the New England Botanical Society, the Ecological Society of America, the American Solar Energy Society, the AAAS, the 1930 Society of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution as well as its Fye Society, and the Jepson Herbarium of UC Berkeley.

    May 21
  • A fourth, more recent project, is appointment to the Reopening Task Force of FPiN, joining a team of three physicians and one microbiologist, for setting guidelines and providing advice on overseeing the emergency of the FPiN community now that vaccinations are prevalent.

    May 21
  • A third project is a continuing role as co-chair and (at times) chair of the Green Congregation Committee at First Parish in Needham, Unitarian Universalist. I'm a staunch advocate for zero Carbon energy and intelligent siting of such, including grid improvements. I'm interested in the digital controls of such networks. But my role is mostly advisory at FPiN, and trying to keep us aligned with supporting proper solutions to the climate emergency.

    May 21
  • A second project is preparing for a five day sailing trip on a Fountain Pajot Mahe 36. (See https://catamaranguru.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/FP_Mahe36.pdf for details.) My older son is skipper and is preparing. I am receiving some training, reviewing my marlinspike seamanship (knots), and doing a lot of studying. I'm quartermaster, crew, and also learning the specialty of marine meteorology. I do know how to sail, but sailing a 36 foot boat is a lot different than the small things I've skippered.

    May 21
  • That project also entails developing photographic techniques for determining numbers of a specific phenophase, and applying spatially balanced sampling techniques to both corroborate those and assess phenophase density.

    May 21
  • Most of my time these days is occupied on four things. First, I have begun a multi-year longitudinal study of four sites in Westwood and Dover, Massachusetts, each containing between five and thirteen plots of mainly mosses, but also, in some instances, lichens and one Dendrolycopodium. This is described here: https://www.overleaf.com/read/tjmjrmwjgmfj . A year is being taken to set the project up, classify all the species, and develop some field survey techniques which makes the objective of the project easier to achieve. That objective is to do long term phenological studies of these communities. Basically, that means identifying when life cycle events ("phenophases") occur each year and noting the Julian Day of the event. Phenology is the study of trends in these events. It is a longitudinal study because the plots and the species in them are being used as their own controls, and having 28 plots means it is statistically easier to detect a common trend among the 28 than in 1.

    May 21
  • I also study other proposals for achieving zero emissions, and sometimes present to and advise local organizations and committees about emissions, and potential climate impacts.

    I am also active in social and political activities relating to the environment, partly through the Green Congregation Committee at the Unitarian Universalist congregation to which I belong, First Parish in Needham, MA, and partly as a staunch advocate for distributed, locally owned solar energy.

    You can learn more about me here. I am a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Statistical Association, the International Society for Bayesian Analysis, the New England Statistical Society, and three organizations at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the Associates, the 1930 Society, and its Fye Society.

    I have also recently taken up sailing again, primarily with my older son, Dave.

    May 21
  • I am an amateur quantitative ecologist now specializing in longitudinal studies of bryophytes, lichens, and club mosses (Lycopodium), ultimately interested in their phenology. I live in Westwood, MA, with my wife, Claire, in a nearly zero Carbon-using home. I began my formal study of bryophytes and kin when I retired a 43 year career as engineer, statistician, and data scientist in November 2020.

    I have been an active student of environmental sciences, particularly the physics, oceanography, and biology of climate change, for decades. Interest in mitigation of climate disruption has also drawn me to a study of energy systems and policy, as well as advocacy. I am currently studying 100% Clean, Renewable Energy and Storage for Everything, a great textbook by Professor Mark Z Jacobson, which I hope to work into a curriculum I can teach online in Summer 2021 or 2022.

    May 21