Introduction: Paul Pukite (WHT)

Hello Azimuthers, very cool forum and really nothing like it anywhere on the internet.

As a belated introduction, I have cultivated an interest in energy and earth sciences over the last 10 years.

I am an EE PhD by education but did my thesis work in material science characterization, ala diffraction theory.

Currently I am operating a blog called http://ContextEarth.com, where I formulate and describe simple models of the environment and climate. Before that I spent time blogging about fossil fuels and eventually combined the posts into a free online book called The Oil Conundrum. I have another book on Markov Modeling for systems analysis, which aligns with the Azimuth interest in directed graphs and Petri nets.

Recently I got involved with a semantic web research effort and host a semantic web server here http://entroplet.com that I maintain. This is a GitHub-based project and if anyone wants to view the code-base, I can give you access via your GitHub user name.


I also spend time arguing with science "flat-earthers", especially climate skeptics and natural resource cornucopians. In grad school, my advisor's advisor was Professor Robert Park, and so I naturally started reading his What's New column and his books describing Voodoo Science and related topics. This has given me the incentive to stir things up, as in :

http://judithcurry.com/2014/09/08/vitaly-khvorostyanov-responds/

That was just today. Read the post and comments if you want to see how skeptics respond when the tables are turned.

I also try to review John's Crackpot Index occasionally to make sure I don't fall into the abyss of craziness. Working collaboratively is one way to avoid this situation, and so that is part of my rationale for contributing to Azimuth.

Comments

  • 1.

    Paul my pleasure to be your friend and colleague here.

    I also try to review John’s Crackpot Index occasionally to make sure I don’t fall into the abyss of craziness.

    Been there my friend but don't tell John. So I cooked up this name I like a lot: MACHINE-TRUST which renders what the computations show without human prejudice or bias.

    My first programmer prof used to admonish me, when I bitched and moaned about my program being correct so something must be wrong with multi-million dollar server: "Machines are not stupid! only stupid humans".

    Dara

    Comment Source:Paul my pleasure to be your friend and colleague here. >I also try to review John’s Crackpot Index occasionally to make sure I don’t fall into the abyss of craziness. Been there my friend but don't tell John. So I cooked up this name I like a lot: MACHINE-TRUST which renders what the computations show without human prejudice or bias. My first programmer prof used to admonish me, when I bitched and moaned about my program being correct so something must be wrong with multi-million dollar server: "Machines are not stupid! only stupid humans". Dara
  • 2.

    Hi Paul. I've partly tried to keep an air of mystery, but as you've formally introduced yourself I'll mention that I used to post over at the oildrum as "embryonic", and I've very much appreciated your comments and work both there and here.

    Comment Source:Hi Paul. I've partly tried to keep an air of mystery, but as you've formally introduced yourself I'll mention that I used to post over at the oildrum as "embryonic", and I've very much appreciated your comments and work both there and here.
  • 3.

    Thanks Dave, I do remember you. Many of us tried to steer TOD towards technical analysis, without getting into the gloom & doom aspects. My nemesis over there was a SW developer named "memmel", who would create these long gloomy narratives that read like he was speaking into DragonDictate.

    Keeping a positive outlook and seeking out forward-thinking solutions is definitely the focus on Azimuth, which makes it an ideal forum.

    Comment Source:Thanks Dave, I do remember you. Many of us tried to steer TOD towards technical analysis, without getting into the gloom & doom aspects. My nemesis over there was a SW developer named "memmel", who would create these long gloomy narratives that read like he was speaking into DragonDictate. Keeping a positive outlook and seeking out forward-thinking solutions is definitely the focus on Azimuth, which makes it an ideal forum.
  • 4.

    Hello Paul I am trying to finish this deadline, so I am not ignoring you

    Comment Source:Hello Paul I am trying to finish this deadline, so I am not ignoring you
  • 5.

    Hello Paul

    Could we rework your application for the water estimates? both ground e.g. rivers and lakes and precipitation i.e. cloud, rain and ice?

    We could use the new geographic regions in Mathematica 10 and map the measures to actual regions on the planet.

    Dara

    Comment Source:Hello Paul Could we rework your application for the water estimates? both ground e.g. rivers and lakes and precipitation i.e. cloud, rain and ice? We could use the new geographic regions in Mathematica 10 and map the measures to actual regions on the planet. Dara
  • 6.
    edited September 2014
    Comment Source:Check this out: [Entity Based Geo-Computations](http://www.wolfram.com/mathematica/new-in-10/entity-based-geocomputation/) [geo vis](http://www.wolfram.com/mathematica/new-in-10/geographic-visualization/) [geo properties](http://www.wolfram.com/mathematica/new-in-10/geo-related-properties/)
  • 7.

    Paul I meant using the GPM volumetric data to redo your water app

    Comment Source:Paul I meant using the GPM volumetric data to redo your water app
  • 8.

    Thanks. Right now I am worried about transitioning to Mathematica 10 because users have said that the DiffEq solution performance has slowed way down.

    I may have to figure out how to run multiple installations of Mathematica first.

    Comment Source:Thanks. Right now I am worried about transitioning to Mathematica 10 because users have said that the DiffEq solution performance has slowed way down. I may have to figure out how to run multiple installations of Mathematica first.
  • 9.

    I may have to figure out how to run multiple installations of Mathematica first.

    Don't or you shall fall into the abyss. I would not run multiple copies on one machine.

    Comment Source:>I may have to figure out how to run multiple installations of Mathematica first. Don't or you shall fall into the abyss. I would not run multiple copies on one machine.
  • 10.

    Thanks for the warning Dara. How about on a separate VM ? Which is difficult for me because of Windows licensing.

    I will lay off this for awhile because I am very happy with Mathematica's speed for the time being.

    Comment Source:Thanks for the warning Dara. How about on a separate VM ? Which is difficult for me because of Windows licensing. I will lay off this for awhile because I am very happy with Mathematica's speed for the time being.
  • 11.

    How about on a separate VM ?

    I would not do that.

    I have 16 cpu mathematica license on a linux server, you could use that if you are interested in serious research and educational materials, like the ones you saw John put together earlier as a first sample with the wavelet functions.

    I like to put myself on a production schedule here to deliver.

    D

    Comment Source:> How about on a separate VM ? I would not do that. I have 16 cpu mathematica license on a linux server, you could use that if you are interested in serious research and educational materials, like the ones you saw John put together earlier as a first sample with the wavelet functions. I like to put myself on a production schedule here to deliver. D
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